Posts Tagged ‘Wyoming land’

Wyoming Land for Sale Offers Exceptional Opportunities.

Wyoming is called the “Cowboy State” and is the epitome of the Old West. As late as 1919, just after World War I, Cheyenne still had more horses than cars. The state is the 10th largest in geographic size, with 98,000 square miles, yet it has a population of only 540,000 people, the least of all 50 states. With so much land and so few people, it is easy to understand why Wyoming land for sale can offer exceptional opportunities.

Wyoming is also known as the “Equality State” because Wyoming women were the first in the nation to have the right to vote, to serve on juries, and to hold public office. In 1894, Estelle Reel became one of the first women in the United States elected to a state office, that of Wyoming State Superintendent of Public Schools. In 1924, Mrs. Nellie Tayloe Ross was the first elected woman governor to take office in the United States.

The state is very conservative politically, and the last Democrat to win a presidential election was Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964. Since then, Wyoming has voted Republican in every presidential election.

Regarding rural land investments, some of the lowest-priced land in the United States of America can be acquired in the southern part of Wyoming, along the I-80 corridor. If a person knows where to look, land can still be found in that region for under $300 per acre, or even cheaper. Not only are land prices very appealing, but property taxes can be as low as 10 cents to 20 cents per acre annually. Finally, subdivision regulations are among the most lenient in the nation. As long as land is divided into parcels that are larger than 140 acres in size, there are very few bureaucratic restrictions or controls.

If a person can find Wyoming land for sale under $300 per acre that can be purchased under beneficial terms, then future profits are simply a matter of holding the land for a long enough period of time.

To view Wyoming land for sale, please click here.

Wyoming Land for Sale at a Cheap Price

Most Wyoming real estate investors take the traditional approach of acquiring land near population centers, like Casper or Cheyenne, and then rely on future development to increase property values. Simply buying a large tract of Wyoming land for sale cheap, located in a sparsely populated area of the state, and allowing time and inflation to create higher values, probably would be boring for them.

The latter approach might be boring to some, but it is an infinitely safer and more reliable method of making money, over the long term. Consider that nothing has to happen, and the owner doesn’t have to improve or develop anything, in order for a tract of cheap acreage to increase in value in future years. It has been proven time and time again that through the years, paper currency always becomes worth less and less, and finite assets such as land always become worth more and more. Therefore, time becomes the ally when buying and holding cheap land.

Conversely, there are countless cases where real estate investors have acquired expensive land near major cities, only to go bankrupt when the economy took a nose dive, politics prevented a needed zone change, building plans weren’t approved, or the financing suddenly became unavailable. While it is certainly possible for urban developers to make substantial sums of money over a short span of time, there usually is a lot more risk and turmoil involved.

Buying a large tract of Wyoming land for sale cheap, even in the middle of the remote Red Desert, and hanging on to it for many years, is almost a “no-brainer” to create greater future values. As history has proven, it is virtually impossible to lose money owning cheap land, if it is purchased cheaply enough and held long enough!

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Wyoming Land a Unique Investment

What makes Wyoming land so unique for investment and speculation opportunities is the abundance of “checkerboard” land created by the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862. Approved by the United States Congress and signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln, this bill gave 10 miles on either side of the tracks—later increased to 20 miles—to the railroad companies to help offset the cost of constructing a railroad to the Pacific Ocean. The United States Government retained half of every township given to the railroads by keeping alternate sections. This resulted in the ownership of these townships resembling a checkerboard with every even-numbered section retained by the government and every odd-numbered section owned by the railroads. Through the years, the railroads resold most of their holdings to private buyers.

For private owners in the checkerboard area, there is a disadvantage offset by a huge benefit. The disadvantage is that it is almost impossible to secure “insurable access” through Bureau of Land Management property; therefore, power and utilities seldom are available, and banks won’t loan for construction where there isn’t insurable access. “Physical access,” however, is a different matter, as access to private property has never been blocked since the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 was passed. Furthermore, title companies will insure ownership of private land in the checkerboard.

The huge benefit for private owners in the checkerboard is that the public can’t cross private land to get to public land, but private owners can cross public land to get to private land.” This amazing policy results in private owners being able to access millions of acres of public land that the general public can’t get to, enjoy or even visit (because to do so would constitute trespassing on private property)!

This unique ownership feature, coupled with a low purchase price, makes Wyoming land in the checkerboard area an asset that can offer substantial future potential. Where else in the entire United States of America can one find more land for less money?

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Cheap Wyoming Land for Sale

In the late 1800s, the history of Cheap Wyoming land for sale was interwoven with the attempt of British aristocrats to create cattle grazing empires. The British were enamored of the new American cattle industry and the potential of utilizing public rangeland. The appeal lay in the fact that private land wouldn’t have to be purchased. These operations were financed by establishing public companies in England and Scotland, with prominent aristocrats serving on the boards of directors.

In 1878, Moreton Frewen was among the first British aristocrats to arrive in Wyoming. His wife was Winston Churchill’s aunt. Flush with money inherited from his father, he settled in northeastern Wyoming and founded the Powder River Cattle Company. For a few years his company grew rapidly, and he grazed 30,000 head of cattle on the public range.

Horace Plunkett, whose father was Baron Dunsany, founded the Frontier Land and Cattle Company. Plunkett’s grazing operations were also quite profitable in the early years. Again, however, instead of buying private land, he relied on free, open rangeland.

British investors started dozens of other cattle companies, but the largest was the Swan Land & Cattle Company, organized by Scottish bankers in 1883. Initial capitalization included almost 100,000 head of cattle and approximately 500,000 acres.

The profitability of these ranches in the early years was astonishing. A three-year-old steer cost $10 to raise and would bring $30 at market. Overall, the annual ROI ran between 20% and 40%. Such financial results made a strong impression on stockholders back in the British Isles.

Within a few short years, however, hard times arrived.

  • First, the open range became overcrowded and uneconomical.
  • Second, the extreme winter of 1886-87 depleted the herds.
  • Third, the marker price for beef cattle declined.

The moral of this story is that business cycles—and cattle—come and go, but land lasts forever and always increases in value through the years. So the British aristocrats should have put their money in private Cheap Wyoming land for sale, instead of relying on free rangeland.

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Understanding Wyoming Land Prices

The State of Wyoming has a huge amount of checkerboard land ownership; therefore to understand Wyoming land prices, it’s important to understand checkerboard land ownership.

President Abraham Lincoln created checkerboard land ownership in 1862, when he signed into law the Pacific Railroad Act. The purpose of this legislation was to expand the railroads from the center of the nation all the way to the Pacific Coast. To facilitate the building of the railroads, the U.S. government gave every alternate section of land, up to 20 miles on either side of the railroad tracks, to the railroad companies. So for every township (a township contains 36 sections of land), the federal government kept 18 sections and gave the other 18 sections to the railroads.

Now, the interesting part of this checkerboard arrangement is the fact that it’s impossible to cross a township without crossing both federal lands and private lands (since they are intermingled throughout the township). To this mix, add legal precedents stating, “The public can’t cross private lands to access federal lands, but private landowners can cross federal lands to access their private lands.”

When the above is fully understood, it becomes clear that there are millions of public acres  in the checkerboard area that can’t be visited, accessed, or enjoyed by the public (in essence, the taxpaying citizens of America). But, amazing as it may seem, the adjoining private owners have every right to cross and access these publicly owned lands en route to their private lands.

Up until now, at least, the private lands in the checkerboard have been valued at less money than private lands outside the checkerboard. But assuming the land isn’t going to be used for residential purposes (it is almost impossible to get building permits in the checkerboard area), what other restrictions apply to checkerboard lands? The answer is almost none!

While Wyoming land prices in the checkerboard area can be as low as $199 per acre (if you know where to look), the land can be used for the same purposes—hunting, camping, horseback riding, rights-of-way for pipelines, cell tower leases, and recreation—that $750-per- acre land is used for. In summary, there is no greater value in Wyoming land prices than those associated with large tracts of private land in the checkerboard area.

To view Wyoming land prices in the checkerboard, please click here.

Cheap Land for Sale in Wyoming

The expansively rugged land called Wyoming resonates with the spirit of the American West. For anyone who has spent time in Wyoming, the state evokes vivid images: cattle standing in the lee of snow fences; children riding horses along dusty roads; weather-beaten ranches lit by the slanting light of late afternoon; oil-covered roustabouts struggling with the furious machinery of a drill rig; the sounds of drumming and singing at a powwow; and cow towns where the area code is larger than the population. The frontier spirit pervades both Wyoming’s landscape and its people, mixing the past and present so completely that sometimes it appears time stands still. There is also something else – a large supply of cheap land for sale in Wyoming that can present some amazing investment and speculation opportunities.

If you are interested in cheap land for sale in Wyoming, and especially the vast central and southwestern part of the state, then you will find some of the best rural land investment opportunities available anywhere in the United States. In fact, Wyoming is one of the five states containing the lowest priced land for sale in the nation. The other four states are Texas, South Dakota, New Mexico and Nevada. No other state in the United States – be it any state east of the Mississippi, any of the Great Plains states or Arizona, Utah, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Oregon or Alaska – will have land for sale at cheaper prices than available in these five states. Of the five states, however, Wyoming, Texas and South Dakota probably offer the best combination of low prices, market demand and relatively lenient subdivision regulations.

The term “cheap” land refers to the per-acre price and not the per-parcel price.  For instance a 160-acre tract for $31,840 is a far cheaper price than a half-acre lot for $2,995. The reason the 160-acre tract is cheaper is because it is costs $199 per-acre while the half-acre lot costs $5,990 per-acre. The key to success in buying rural land is to concentrate on the per-acre price and not the per-parcel price. Since the Pilgrims landed in 1620 and Americans began migrating west, land dealers have made fortunes buying land by the acre and selling lots by the parcel!

There is more to consider in buying cheap land for sale in Wyoming, however, than the price itself. While the price is of paramount, importance market desirability and applicable subdivision regulations are also major concerns. Wyoming rates at the top of the list in all three categories. Land prices in Wyoming are very affordable, almost every land investor in the United States wants to own a tract of land in Wyoming and there are very few state or county subdivision regulations affecting the division or sale of land in 160-acre sizes or larger.

In summary Wyoming offers some of the cheapest per-acre land prices to be found anywhere in the United States, and is an excellent place to acquire a large tract of cheap land!

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