Posts Tagged ‘Cheap land’

Wyoming Land for Sale Offers Exceptional Opportunities.

Wyoming is called the “Cowboy State” and is the epitome of the Old West. As late as 1919, just after World War I, Cheyenne still had more horses than cars. The state is the 10th largest in geographic size, with 98,000 square miles, yet it has a population of only 540,000 people, the least of all 50 states. With so much land and so few people, it is easy to understand why Wyoming land for sale can offer exceptional opportunities.

Wyoming is also known as the “Equality State” because Wyoming women were the first in the nation to have the right to vote, to serve on juries, and to hold public office. In 1894, Estelle Reel became one of the first women in the United States elected to a state office, that of Wyoming State Superintendent of Public Schools. In 1924, Mrs. Nellie Tayloe Ross was the first elected woman governor to take office in the United States.

The state is very conservative politically, and the last Democrat to win a presidential election was Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964. Since then, Wyoming has voted Republican in every presidential election.

Regarding rural land investments, some of the lowest-priced land in the United States of America can be acquired in the southern part of Wyoming, along the I-80 corridor. If a person knows where to look, land can still be found in that region for under $300 per acre, or even cheaper. Not only are land prices very appealing, but property taxes can be as low as 10 cents to 20 cents per acre annually. Finally, subdivision regulations are among the most lenient in the nation. As long as land is divided into parcels that are larger than 140 acres in size, there are very few bureaucratic restrictions or controls.

If a person can find Wyoming land for sale under $300 per acre that can be purchased under beneficial terms, then future profits are simply a matter of holding the land for a long enough period of time.

To view Wyoming land for sale, please click here.

Wyoming Land a Unique Investment

What makes Wyoming land so unique for investment and speculation opportunities is the abundance of “checkerboard” land created by the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862. Approved by the United States Congress and signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln, this bill gave 10 miles on either side of the tracks—later increased to 20 miles—to the railroad companies to help offset the cost of constructing a railroad to the Pacific Ocean. The United States Government retained half of every township given to the railroads by keeping alternate sections. This resulted in the ownership of these townships resembling a checkerboard with every even-numbered section retained by the government and every odd-numbered section owned by the railroads. Through the years, the railroads resold most of their holdings to private buyers.

For private owners in the checkerboard area, there is a disadvantage offset by a huge benefit. The disadvantage is that it is almost impossible to secure “insurable access” through Bureau of Land Management property; therefore, power and utilities seldom are available, and banks won’t loan for construction where there isn’t insurable access. “Physical access,” however, is a different matter, as access to private property has never been blocked since the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 was passed. Furthermore, title companies will insure ownership of private land in the checkerboard.

The huge benefit for private owners in the checkerboard is that the public can’t cross private land to get to public land, but private owners can cross public land to get to private land.” This amazing policy results in private owners being able to access millions of acres of public land that the general public can’t get to, enjoy or even visit (because to do so would constitute trespassing on private property)!

This unique ownership feature, coupled with a low purchase price, makes Wyoming land in the checkerboard area an asset that can offer substantial future potential. Where else in the entire United States of America can one find more land for less money?

To view properties for sale, CLICK HERE

Wyoming Acreage for Sale

Wyoming acreage for sale became more sought-after due to the inability to build railroad tracks through the 14,000-foot heights of the majestic Colorado Rockies. The Union Pacific Railroad greatly coveted the growing commerce base in Denver, but from that point west, the laying of tracks over the Rockies was too formidable a project. Instead, the Union Pacific decided, in November of 1866, to lay its tracks due west from Cheyenne through unsettled Wyoming.

By 1875, perhaps as many as 350,000 people had traveled across Wyoming by rail, wagon train, stagecoach, horseback and foot. On July 10, 1890, President Benjamin Harrison signed the act making Wyoming the 44th state.

Wyoming is one of the four or five large Western states containing the lowest-priced acreage available in the United States. This alone makes land in the state very desirable to real estate speculators and investors.

Wyoming covers almost 98,000 square miles, stretching 375 miles from east to west and 276 miles from north to south. The 10 states of Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont, Maryland, Massachusetts, West Virginia and New Hampshire would all fit into Wyoming’s borders with room to spare.

It’s often been said that a few good land investments can equal a lifetime of working for a salary. A person pays income tax, at relatively high rates, on salary received each and every year. On the other hand, if a person buys a tract of land that appreciates every year, no income taxes are due. And when the land is sold, it is taxed at a much lower capital gains rate. Buying a large tract of low-priced Wyoming acreage for sale, holding it for many years, selling out for a large profit and paying a small capital gains tax will beat working for a salary every day of the year!

To view properties for sale, CLICK HERE

Where is the Cheapest Land in Wyoming?

Is there any other place besides Wyoming in the entire United States of America where one can find more land for less money?

The reason Wyoming presents such interesting investment opportunities is that there is a large amount of “checkerboard” land ownership in the state. The “checkerboard” ownership in Wyoming is among the largest of all 50 states.

A little history: The Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 was approved by the United States Congress and signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln for the purpose of aiding the construction of railroads from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean. This bill gave 10 miles on either side of the tracks to the railroad companies to help offset the cost of construction. The Pacific Railroad Act of 1864 expanded that distance to 20 miles on either side of the tracks. The United States Government retained half of every township given to the railroads by keeping alternate sections. This resulted in the ownership of these townships resembling a checkerboard, with every even-numbered section owned by the government and every odd-numbered section owned by the railroads. Over the years, the railroads resold a large portion of their holdings to private individuals.

For private owners of land in the checkerboard, there is a disadvantage offset by a huge benefit. The disadvantage is that it is almost impossible to secure “insurable access” through federal property; therefore, power and utilities are seldom available, and banks won’t loan for construction where there isn’t insurable access. “Physical access,” however, is a different matter. The government has never blocked access to private property since the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 was passed; and furthermore, title companies will insure ownership of private land in the checkerboard.

The huge benefit for private landowners in the checkerboard is that “the public can’t cross private land to get to public land, but private owners can cross public land to get to private land.” This amazing policy means thatprivate owners can access millions of acres of public land that the general public can’t get to, enjoy or even visit (because to do so would constitute “trespassing” on private property)! This unique ownership feature, coupled with a low purchase price, makes checkerboard land an asset that can offer substantial future potential.

The cheapest land in Wyoming can be found in the southern part of the state along the I-80 corridor. If you know where to look, land in this area can still be purchased for less than $250 per acre, but these prices are rapidly disappearing.

To view some of the cheapest land in Wyoming CLICK HERE

Cheap Wyoming Land for Sale

In the late 1800s, the history of Cheap Wyoming land for sale was interwoven with the attempt of British aristocrats to create cattle grazing empires. The British were enamored of the new American cattle industry and the potential of utilizing public rangeland. The appeal lay in the fact that private land wouldn’t have to be purchased. These operations were financed by establishing public companies in England and Scotland, with prominent aristocrats serving on the boards of directors.

In 1878, Moreton Frewen was among the first British aristocrats to arrive in Wyoming. His wife was Winston Churchill’s aunt. Flush with money inherited from his father, he settled in northeastern Wyoming and founded the Powder River Cattle Company. For a few years his company grew rapidly, and he grazed 30,000 head of cattle on the public range.

Horace Plunkett, whose father was Baron Dunsany, founded the Frontier Land and Cattle Company. Plunkett’s grazing operations were also quite profitable in the early years. Again, however, instead of buying private land, he relied on free, open rangeland.

British investors started dozens of other cattle companies, but the largest was the Swan Land & Cattle Company, organized by Scottish bankers in 1883. Initial capitalization included almost 100,000 head of cattle and approximately 500,000 acres.

The profitability of these ranches in the early years was astonishing. A three-year-old steer cost $10 to raise and would bring $30 at market. Overall, the annual ROI ran between 20% and 40%. Such financial results made a strong impression on stockholders back in the British Isles.

Within a few short years, however, hard times arrived.

  • First, the open range became overcrowded and uneconomical.
  • Second, the extreme winter of 1886-87 depleted the herds.
  • Third, the marker price for beef cattle declined.

The moral of this story is that business cycles—and cattle—come and go, but land lasts forever and always increases in value through the years. So the British aristocrats should have put their money in private Cheap Wyoming land for sale, instead of relying on free rangeland.

To view properties for sale, CLICK HERE

Protecting Yourself Against Hyperinflation

What exactly is hyperinflation? In a nutshell, it is a massive and rapid increase in the amount of money available that is not supported by a corresponding growth in the amount of goods and services. In other words, there is an imbalance between supply and demand for paper money. Given these facts, how can one protect against hyperinflation?

The most important thing is to take advantage of the above formula and exchange depreciating paper money for increasing finite assets. What are finite assets? One the most common finite asset would be raw land. The government can print trillions of new dollars, but it can’t print one acre of new land.

So let’s provide a simple example of how buying raw land would protect against hyperinflation.

Let’s take the case of two hypothetical people, Mr. Jones and Mr. Smith. Mr. Jones has $1 million cash in the bank and he uses this cash to purchase 2,500 acres for $400 per acre. Mr. Smith also has $1 million in the bank, but he elects to leave it there. Thereafter, let’s suppose, for illustrative purpose only, that the federal government prints enough new dollars to match all the existing dollars currently in circulation.

What does all of this mean?

It means that being as there is now twice as many paper dollars available, the value of previous dollars are worth half of what they used to be. It also means that since no new land was created, the same amount of land still exists. Therefore, if there are twice as many dollars to buy the same finite supply of land, that land will sell for twice as many dollars as it did previously.

The end result for Mr. Smith is that he still has his $1 million cash in the bank, but it is only worth (in buying power of goods and services) one-half of what it was before the government printed the new dollars. Mr. Jones, however, had 2,500 acres worth $800 per acre, or $2 million. Mr. Jones knew how to protect against hyperinflation by exchanging his dollars into an asset that the government couldn’t reproduce.

To view land that can be used to protect against hyperinflation, click here.

Buying Land for Investment

Buying land for investment has never been easier. With large tracts of cheap land available in the United States, anyone hoping to invest in land can do it for a low cost. Some of the very best deals can be found in Wyoming, Texas, Oklahoma and South Dakota. Many of the parcels sold in these states are considered wise investments for several reasons.

Most individuals who have bought land for investment have not been disappointed. Purchasing cheap land has given many the opportunity to increase their investment just by holding onto the land for a long period of time. By doing this, investors can take advantage of the fact that inflation takes over and increases the value of the land as time goes by. The good thing about time is that it never ceases moving forward. This means that the value of land will always increase, especially if it is purchased at a cheap price.

The cheapest land in America does not have any amenities. The land is raw, but for many, it has been a great investment time and time again. Occasionally, in the past, owners of land like this have been approached by public and private organizations hoping to purchase their land.

Some cheap land is neighbored by government properties. The government owns large amounts of cheap land, as do many private organizations. Large development projects headed by public or private organizations could require the purchase of land close to privately owned cheap land. When that happens, the adjoining cheap land can appreciate in value quite rapidly. This is not always the case, but it is one of the best-case scenarios for those who are buying land for investment.

If you are interested in buying land for investment, please click here.

What is a Farmland Investor?

farmland investor, like a hedge fund investor, can make large sums of money if he is extremely knowledgeable and lucky, or he can get wiped out if he doesn’t know what he is doing and is unlucky.

Buying land for farming, at the right price and terms, is just the initial step in a very complex investment scheme. After acquiring the land, the right crop must be planted, operating expenses must be controlled, the weather must cooperate, and the price for the crop (which is really nothing more than a commodity) at harvest must be favorable. If all of these “moving parts” (many of which are beyond the control of the farmer) aren’t lined up favorable, the losses can be staggering.

Suppose a farmer paid $7,000 per acre for 500 acres of irrigated farm land, and during a five year period made a profit of $200 per acre one year, broke even the second year, and lost $300 per acre, $100 per acre, and $500 per acre for the last three years. Simple mathematics reveals he would be down, over the five year period, the equivalent of $700 per acre. This means his 500 acre farm would have had to increase in value 10% just for him to break even.

So if farming relies, in part, on land increasing in value in order to show a profit, why not simply invest in cheap land and forget all the expenses and complex operations required in farming? Instead of investing $3.5 million for an improved 500 acre irrigated farm that requires additional capital and operations, wouldn’t it make more sense to use the same $3.5 million to purchase 14,000 acres of cheap, dry prairie land for $250 per acre? Thus, at the end of five years, if the 14,000 acres increased in value by 10%, the $350,000 increase would be pure profit (and not required just to “break even”)!

Anyone interested in becoming a farmland investor might be well served to at least analyze the merits and simplicity of investing in large tracts of cheap land instead!

Note: This article is not intended as an in-depth review of farming operations and profit potentials; rather it is a reminder that farming operations always require greater capital and greater financial risks than does the activity of simply owning cheap land and relying on time and inflation to cause higher values.

For the farmland investor to review alternative investments, click here.

Land as an Investment is Always Profitable

Land as an investment can be a marvelous and amazing process to behold. In the beginning, there is no crystal ball that can predict with absolute certainty what the future will bring. Consider the following two examples—both ultimately profitable—that began almost 100 years ago.

In 1917, Utah rancher Thomas L. Williams purchased 140 acres north of Las Vegas for $8 per acre and subdivided 100 of the acres in 79 lots. This was the beginning of the town of North Las Vegas. Williams eventually sold all of his lots to residents who liked the idea of no taxes, no building restrictions, and no license requirements. With the coming of Prohibition in the 1920s, he sold quite a few lots to bootleggers who built their homes over basements containing stills.

When the Hoover Dam was constructed during the 1930s, it brought new prosperity to the region. After World War II, in the late 1940s, the gambling industry began to develop. Thereafter, Las Vegas and its surrounding suburbs developed into a multibillion-dollar mecca of glittering resorts, attracting many millions of tourists annually.

And what would Mr. Williams’ 140 acres, which he purchased for $1,120 back in 1917, be worth today? Try around $50 million.

The second example would be a 50,000-acre ranch located in the middle of Nevada, also purchased in the same year of 1917 for $1 per acre. Unlike Mr. Williams’ 140 acres next to Las Vegas, during the ensuing years, absolutely nothing developed near this ranch. Very few new residents arrived, no casinos, shopping centers, or housing developments were built, no new roads were constructed—in fact, the ranch is still being used today to graze cattle, just as it was back in 1917.

So what is the 50,000 acres worth today? It is worth around $10 million.

What is the moral of this little analogy? Mainly that land as an investment—assuming it is purchased cheaply enough and held long enough—will always be profitable. The only variable will be the magnitude of profitability.

To view land as an investment, please click here.

The Best Hedge Against Inflation

In broad economic terms, inflation is the devaluing of purchasing power due to an increased influx of printed currency. A hedge is an investment opportunity that can help shield a person against such economic instability. Typically, hedges are things that have a finite supply. Stocks, bonds, automobiles, machinery, equipment, and even food, would make poor hedges, because all of these items can readily be reproduced and can easily become perishable. On the other hand, an asset such as land would make the best hedge against inflation because no one can make any more of it, and it isn’t perishable.

Since the founding of our nation 235 years ago, raw land, as a dependable financial asset, has withstood the test of time. As a prime example, let’s suppose Ben Franklin, in 1776, had placed $10,000 of freshly printed currency in one safe deposit box in Philadelphia; and in another safe deposit box he place a deed for 10,000 acres that were located somewhere in the “wilderness.” Today, the $10,000 in 1776 currency would be practically worthless (inflation over 235 years would have destroyed most of its buying power), yet the 10,000 acres, depending on their exact location, would be worth millions of dollars.

Small residential rental properties (single-family homes and duplexes) can also serve as an investment hedge, but there are many potential liabilities involved. Tenants can cause serious damage; maintenance can be quite high; property taxes and insurance can eat into profits; and in a serious recession tenants can move out and the income ceases.

In summary, perhaps the very best hedge against inflation would be to simply acquire a large tract of cheaply price land in the “boondocks” and wait, wait and wait!

To view land that would serve as the best hedge against inflation, please click here.