Posts Tagged ‘cheap land in Wyoming’

Wyoming Land for Sale Offers Exceptional Opportunities.

Wyoming is called the “Cowboy State” and is the epitome of the Old West. As late as 1919, just after World War I, Cheyenne still had more horses than cars. The state is the 10th largest in geographic size, with 98,000 square miles, yet it has a population of only 540,000 people, the least of all 50 states. With so much land and so few people, it is easy to understand why Wyoming land for sale can offer exceptional opportunities.

Wyoming is also known as the “Equality State” because Wyoming women were the first in the nation to have the right to vote, to serve on juries, and to hold public office. In 1894, Estelle Reel became one of the first women in the United States elected to a state office, that of Wyoming State Superintendent of Public Schools. In 1924, Mrs. Nellie Tayloe Ross was the first elected woman governor to take office in the United States.

The state is very conservative politically, and the last Democrat to win a presidential election was Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964. Since then, Wyoming has voted Republican in every presidential election.

Regarding rural land investments, some of the lowest-priced land in the United States of America can be acquired in the southern part of Wyoming, along the I-80 corridor. If a person knows where to look, land can still be found in that region for under $300 per acre, or even cheaper. Not only are land prices very appealing, but property taxes can be as low as 10 cents to 20 cents per acre annually. Finally, subdivision regulations are among the most lenient in the nation. As long as land is divided into parcels that are larger than 140 acres in size, there are very few bureaucratic restrictions or controls.

If a person can find Wyoming land for sale under $300 per acre that can be purchased under beneficial terms, then future profits are simply a matter of holding the land for a long enough period of time.

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Wyoming Land a Unique Investment

What makes Wyoming land so unique for investment and speculation opportunities is the abundance of “checkerboard” land created by the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862. Approved by the United States Congress and signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln, this bill gave 10 miles on either side of the tracks—later increased to 20 miles—to the railroad companies to help offset the cost of constructing a railroad to the Pacific Ocean. The United States Government retained half of every township given to the railroads by keeping alternate sections. This resulted in the ownership of these townships resembling a checkerboard with every even-numbered section retained by the government and every odd-numbered section owned by the railroads. Through the years, the railroads resold most of their holdings to private buyers.

For private owners in the checkerboard area, there is a disadvantage offset by a huge benefit. The disadvantage is that it is almost impossible to secure “insurable access” through Bureau of Land Management property; therefore, power and utilities seldom are available, and banks won’t loan for construction where there isn’t insurable access. “Physical access,” however, is a different matter, as access to private property has never been blocked since the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 was passed. Furthermore, title companies will insure ownership of private land in the checkerboard.

The huge benefit for private owners in the checkerboard is that the public can’t cross private land to get to public land, but private owners can cross public land to get to private land.” This amazing policy results in private owners being able to access millions of acres of public land that the general public can’t get to, enjoy or even visit (because to do so would constitute trespassing on private property)!

This unique ownership feature, coupled with a low purchase price, makes Wyoming land in the checkerboard area an asset that can offer substantial future potential. Where else in the entire United States of America can one find more land for less money?

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Where is the Cheapest Land in Wyoming?

Is there any other place besides Wyoming in the entire United States of America where one can find more land for less money?

The reason Wyoming presents such interesting investment opportunities is that there is a large amount of “checkerboard” land ownership in the state. The “checkerboard” ownership in Wyoming is among the largest of all 50 states.

A little history: The Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 was approved by the United States Congress and signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln for the purpose of aiding the construction of railroads from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean. This bill gave 10 miles on either side of the tracks to the railroad companies to help offset the cost of construction. The Pacific Railroad Act of 1864 expanded that distance to 20 miles on either side of the tracks. The United States Government retained half of every township given to the railroads by keeping alternate sections. This resulted in the ownership of these townships resembling a checkerboard, with every even-numbered section owned by the government and every odd-numbered section owned by the railroads. Over the years, the railroads resold a large portion of their holdings to private individuals.

For private owners of land in the checkerboard, there is a disadvantage offset by a huge benefit. The disadvantage is that it is almost impossible to secure “insurable access” through federal property; therefore, power and utilities are seldom available, and banks won’t loan for construction where there isn’t insurable access. “Physical access,” however, is a different matter. The government has never blocked access to private property since the Pacific Railroad Act of 1862 was passed; and furthermore, title companies will insure ownership of private land in the checkerboard.

The huge benefit for private landowners in the checkerboard is that “the public can’t cross private land to get to public land, but private owners can cross public land to get to private land.” This amazing policy means thatprivate owners can access millions of acres of public land that the general public can’t get to, enjoy or even visit (because to do so would constitute “trespassing” on private property)! This unique ownership feature, coupled with a low purchase price, makes checkerboard land an asset that can offer substantial future potential.

The cheapest land in Wyoming can be found in the southern part of the state along the I-80 corridor. If you know where to look, land in this area can still be purchased for less than $250 per acre, but these prices are rapidly disappearing.

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Cheap Wyoming Land for Sale

In the late 1800s, the history of Cheap Wyoming land for sale was interwoven with the attempt of British aristocrats to create cattle grazing empires. The British were enamored of the new American cattle industry and the potential of utilizing public rangeland. The appeal lay in the fact that private land wouldn’t have to be purchased. These operations were financed by establishing public companies in England and Scotland, with prominent aristocrats serving on the boards of directors.

In 1878, Moreton Frewen was among the first British aristocrats to arrive in Wyoming. His wife was Winston Churchill’s aunt. Flush with money inherited from his father, he settled in northeastern Wyoming and founded the Powder River Cattle Company. For a few years his company grew rapidly, and he grazed 30,000 head of cattle on the public range.

Horace Plunkett, whose father was Baron Dunsany, founded the Frontier Land and Cattle Company. Plunkett’s grazing operations were also quite profitable in the early years. Again, however, instead of buying private land, he relied on free, open rangeland.

British investors started dozens of other cattle companies, but the largest was the Swan Land & Cattle Company, organized by Scottish bankers in 1883. Initial capitalization included almost 100,000 head of cattle and approximately 500,000 acres.

The profitability of these ranches in the early years was astonishing. A three-year-old steer cost $10 to raise and would bring $30 at market. Overall, the annual ROI ran between 20% and 40%. Such financial results made a strong impression on stockholders back in the British Isles.

Within a few short years, however, hard times arrived.

  • First, the open range became overcrowded and uneconomical.
  • Second, the extreme winter of 1886-87 depleted the herds.
  • Third, the marker price for beef cattle declined.

The moral of this story is that business cycles—and cattle—come and go, but land lasts forever and always increases in value through the years. So the British aristocrats should have put their money in private Cheap Wyoming land for sale, instead of relying on free rangeland.

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